News

New Teleneurology Curriculum Provides Guidelines for Care

Researchers recommend protocols to tame ‘Wild West’ landscape of teleneurology Health professionals can deliver quality neurological care remotely to patients through the emerging field of teleneurology. However, medical training has not caught up with the field, and formalized education for teleneurology is needed. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, as part of an American Academy of Neurology (AAN) team, has developed a standardized curriculum for providing remote neurology care via telecommunication. Read More

Telehealth Reduces Wait Time, Improves Care for Children with Autism Living in Remote Areas

Long wait times have been a persistent issue for families waiting to see an autism specialist, with waits often exceeding a year. Additionally, children with autism living in rural areas have added costs associated with traveling long distances for health care. To address these issues, ECHO Autism, a University of Missouri program, has been successfully training primary care providers to diagnose and manage autism spectrum disorders. Now, Kristin Sohl, MD, an associate professor of child health and the director of ECHO Autism, is preparing to expand the program with ECHO Autism partner sites serving Alabama, Alaska and under-served Navajo communities in New Mexico and Arizona. ECHO Autism also is set to expand globally through partner sites in Kenya. In the past year, Sohl has conducted autism specific trainings for ECHO Uruguay. Read More

Breast Milk Protein Safely Reduces Hospital Infections in Preemies

Responding to a call from the American Academy of Pediatrics to reduce hospital-acquired infections in neonatal intensive care units across the country, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the MU Sinclair School of Nursing have found a protein in breast milk to be a safe and efficient solution. Read More

Measurement Helps Craniofacial Surgeons Better Evaluate Children with Skull Deformity

A baby’s skull is made of several plates of bone that fuse together over time to form a single structure. Previous research has shown that approximately one in 2,000 babies have plates that fuse too early — a condition called craniosynostosis — causing cranial deformities that can lead to learning impairments and other neurodevelopmental problems. Craniofacial surgeons across the country differ on when surgical intervention is needed for some abnormalities. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine are recommending a new method to help determine when surgery is needed. Read More

Protein in Breast Milk Reduces Infection Risk in Premature Infants

Full-term babies receive natural protection from their mothers that helps them fight off dangerous infections. However, babies born prematurely lack protective intestinal bacteria and often are unable to be nursed, causing their infection-fighting capabilities to be underdeveloped. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the MU Sinclair School of Nursing have found that a manufactured form of lactoferrin, a naturally occurring protein in breast milk, can help protect premature infants from a type of staph infection. Read More

Researchers Find Potential Key to Preventing Heart Attacks, Strokes in Older Adults

As men and women grow older, their chances for coronary heart disease also increase. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries, which can lead to serious problems, including heart attacks, strokes or even death. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), a protein that is naturally found in high levels among adolescents, can help prevent arteries from clogging. They say that increasing atherosclerosis patients’ levels of the protein could reduce the amount of plaque buildup in their arteries, lowering their risk of heart disease. Read More

Participants Go Bald for Childhood Cancer Research

University of Missouri School of Medicine students led the community in raising money for childhood cancer research by shaving their heads on April 9. The event, which shows solidarity with pediatric cancer patients who lost their hair as a result of treatment, supports the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. St. Baldrick’s is the largest volunteer-driven fundraising program for childhood cancer research. Read More

Infant-friendly Flu Vaccine Developed with Key Protein

According to the World Health Organization, influenza causes serious illness among millions of people each year, resulting in 250,000 to 500,000 deaths. Those most at risk include infants younger than six months, because they cannot be vaccinated against the disease. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified a naturally occurring protein that, when added to the flu vaccine, may offer protection to babies during their first months of life. Read More