News

Fighting Cancer: New Microscopic Technique Could Help Detect, Diagnose Metastatic Melanomas

The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. For years, melanoma researchers have studied samples that were considered uniform in size and color, making them easier to examine by more conventional means. But melanomas don’t always come in the same shape and hue; often, melanomas are irregular and dark, making them difficult to investigate. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have devised a new tool to detect and analyze single melanoma cells that are more representative of the skin cancers developed by most patients. The study, recently reported in Analyst published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, outlines the new techniques that could lead to better and faster diagnoses for the life-threatening disease. Read More

MU School of Medicine Dean Inducted into Prestigious Medical Society

Patrice “Patrick” Delafontaine, MD, Hugh E. and Sarah D. Stephenson Dean of the MU School of Medicine, has been inducted into the American Clinical and Climatological Association (ACCA). Active membership in this society is limited to 250 physicians. Delafontaine is the only ACCA member at MU and one of only eight members from Missouri. Read More

Enzyme May Reduce Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Caused by HIV Medications

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 37 million people are living with HIV. Antiviral medications are used to control the disease and prevent its progression to AIDS. Although antivirals improve health and increase survival for people with HIV, their use also has been linked to the development of cardiovascular disease. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified an enzyme that may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease caused by HIV medications. Read More

Binge Drinking with Chronic Alcohol Use More Destructive than Previously Thought

Excessive alcohol consumption is a global public health issue. In the United States, binge drinking is the most common form ― so common, in fact, that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports approximately one in six adults binge drinks about four times each month. Now, a study by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers shows that chronic alcohol use, when combined with repeated binge drinking, causes more damage to the liver than previously thought. Read More

Binge Drinking with Chronic Alcohol Use More Destructive than Previously Thought

Excessive alcohol consumption is a global public health issue. In the United States, binge drinking is the most common form ― so common, in fact, that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports approximately one in six adults binge drinks about four times each month. Now, a study by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers shows that chronic alcohol use, when combined with repeated binge drinking, causes more damage to the liver than previously thought. Read More

Binge Drinking with Chronic Alcohol Use More Destructive than Previously Thought

Excessive alcohol consumption is a global public health issue. In the United States, binge drinking is the most common form ― so common, in fact, that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports approximately one in six adults binge drinks about four times each month. Now, a study by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers shows that chronic alcohol use, when combined with repeated binge drinking, causes more damage to the liver than previously thought. Read More

New Research Shows Weekend Binge Drinking Could Leave Lasting Liver Damage

Long after a hangover, a night of bad decisions might take a bigger toll on the body than previously understood. Described in the current issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, a study at the University of Missouri has revealed a unique connection between binge drinking and the risk for developing alcoholic liver disease and a variety of other health problems. Read More

Professor Recognized as International Leader in Microcirculation Research

Gerald Meininger, PhD, Margaret Proctor Mulligan Distinguished Professor in Medical Research and professor in the Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, received the Kitanomaru Award at the 10th World Congress for Microcirculation recently held in Kyoto, Japan. The Kitanomaru Award is presented to outstanding leaders in the field of microcirculation research. Read More

Researchers Identify Mechanism that Impairs Blood Flow with Aging

With the world’s elderly population expected to double by 2050, understanding how aging affects the body is an important focus for researchers globally. Cardiovascular disease, the No. 1 cause of death worldwide, often is associated with aging arteries that restrict blood flow. Now, University of Missouri researchers have identified an age-related cause of arterial dysfunction, a finding that could lead to future treatments for some forms of vascular disease. Read More